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VISUALIZATION '98 TUTORIALS
Sunday, Monday, Tuesday

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TUTORIAL 1

Sunday 9:30-6:30, Royal A & B

Wavelet and Numerical Methods for Visualization


Instructors: Raghu Machiraju, Nelson Max, Torsten Mšller, Robert Moorhead
Level: Intermediate

Course Description:
The focus of this course is a survey of wavelet and numerical tools for the imaging and visualization process. We will introduce basic numerical concepts of interpolation and approximation theory. The application of this theory to volume rendering and image analysis is demonstrated by different current research results. We especially introduce signal processing analysis tools and wavelet techniques. We show their origin (connection) to numerical analysis and their practical interpretation and use for the specification of image artifacts such as blurring and aliasing as well as for efficient algorithms (multi-resolution analysis).

Who Should Attend:

This tutorial is designed for scientists, engineers, computer graphicists, and graduate students who are interested in learning more about the mathematical foundations of imaging and visualization algorithms. It would also be of interest to professionals who would like to learn state-of-the-art techniques in image analysis and compression using multi-resolution techniques, including wavelets. Some basic mathematical background and exposure to volume rendering is assumed.

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TUTORIAL 2

Sunday 9:30-6:30, Imperial II

Visualization Toolkits: Applications and Techniques

Instructors: Kenneth M. Martin, Lisa Sobierajski Avila, William E. Lorensen, James V. Miller, William J. Schroeder
Level: Intermediate

Course Description:
In this tutorial we will discuss fundamental issues regarding the design, implementation, and application of 3D graphics and visualization systems. We will describe and contrast some current systems such as Open Inventor, Java3D, Data Explorer and the Visualization Toolkit. We will examine in more detail the implementation of the Visualization Toolkit. This will be used to illustrate important design issues such as graphics portability, interpreted versus compiled languages, multiple versus single inheritance, data flow models, and user interaction methods. In the remainder of this tutorial we will focus on applying visualization techniques and toolkits to solve problems from a selection of application domains.

Who Should Attend:
Attendees should have a basic understanding of computer graphics principles, software development techniques, and visualization algorithms such as color mapping and contouring.   This course is intended for users, developers, researchers, and practitioners of 3D graphics and data visualization.

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TUTORIAL 3
Monday 8:30-5:30, Imperial II

Introduction to Programming with Java 3D

Instructors: David R. Nadeau (Organizer and Speaker), Michael J. Bailey, Henry A. Sowizral
Level: Intermediate

Course Description:
Java 3D is a new cross-platform API for developing 3D graphics applications in Java. Java 3D’s feature set has been designed to enable quick development of complex 3D applications, and at the same time enable fast and efficient implementations on a variety of platforms, from PCs to workstations. Using Java 3D, software developers can build cross-platform applications that build 3D scenes programmatically, or via loading 3D content from VRML, OBJ, and/or other external files.

The Java 3D API includes a rich feature set for building shapes, composing behaviors, interacting with the user, and controlling rendering details. Participants in this tutorial learn the concepts behind Java 3D, the Java 3D class hierarchy, typical usage patterns, ways of avoiding common mistakes, animation and scene design techniques, and tricks for increasing performance and realism.

Who Should Attend:
This tutorial assumes an intermediate level knowledge of Java programming and a beginning understanding of 3D graphics concepts. No advanced math background is required.

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TUTORIAL 4
Monday 8:30-5:30, Imperial III

Perception for Visualization: From Design To Evaluation

Instructors: Haim Levkowitz (Organizer and Speaker), Victoria Interrante, Hans Peter Meinzer
Level: Intermediate

Course Description:
  1. What is the smallest sample I can show that will be perceived?
  2. What is the smallest sample I can show that will be perceived in color?
  3. Can I afford using image compression? If yes, how much and what kind?
  4. Should I use a grayscale or another color scale?  How many gray levels do I absolutely need?  What color scale should I use?  How many bits for color do I need to have?
  5. Should I use 3D, stereo, texture, motion?  If so what kinds?   and
  6. Has my visualization been successful meeting its goals and needs?
If you have ever designed a visualization, you probably have asked yourself (perhaps others) some of these questions; at least you should have.   Since visualization “consumers’’ are humans, the answers to these questions can only come from a thorough analysis and understanding of human perceptual capabilities and limitations, combined with the visualization’s goals and needs.   This tutorial will teach you the basics of human perception and how to utilize them in the complete process of visualization: from design to evaluation.

Who Should Attend:
Anybody engaged in the design, implementation, and evaluation of visualizations.

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TUTORIAL 5
Tuesday 8:30-5:30, Imperial II


Interactive Visualization and Web-based Exploration in the Physical and Natural Sciences

Instructors: Theresa Marie Rhyne (Organizer and Speaker), Mike Bailey, Mike Botts, Lloyd Treinish
Level: Intermediate

Course Description:
This tutorial will examine the convergence of visualization methods with the World Wide Web as well as the relationship between real-time interactivity and scientific information exploration. The application of visualization tools and interactive techniques to the examination and interpretation of scientific data sets will be discussed.  Highly illustrative atmospheric, oceanographic, and geographic examples will be demonstrated in real time. The process of developing effective visualization paradigms for supporting high speed networking, database management, heterogeneous computing platforms, user interface design, collaborative computing, science education, and the implementation of animation techniques will be highlighted.  In addition to examining 3D graphics displays, one case study will also explore solid freeform fabrication as a visualization tool.

Who Should Attend:
Scientific researchers, educators, and computer graphics specialists interested in exploring particular issues associated with handling the visual display of scientific information and large scientific data sets. Experience with scientific visualization systems and terminology is helpful as well as an understanding of computer graphics programming.

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TUTORIAL 6
Tuesday 8:30-5:30, Imperial III

Level-Of-Detail in Surface and Volume Modeling

Instructors: L. De Floriani, E. Puppo, R. Scopigno
Level: Intermediate

Course Description:
Participants will learn how to manage the complexity of 3D graphics datasets (surfaces and volumes). The course offers in-depth coverage of compression and simplification techniques, and multiresolution data representation schemes. Applications will also be presented in the fields of terrain visualization, volume data rendering, surface rendering, and web-based systems.

Who Should Attend:
This tutorial is intended for programmers or researchers interested in developing efficient, interactive 3D visual applications.

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TUTORIAL 7
Tuesday 8:30-12:30, Imperial V

Clifford Algebra, Quaternions and their Applications in Visualization

Instructors: Hans Hagen, Andrew Hanson, Gerik Scheuermann
Level: Beginner

Course Description:
Quaternions build a four-dimensional algebra for three-dimensional geometry. They give the best way to deal with rotations in 3-space. In Scientific Visualization, one has used them to deal with vector fields in space and for animations because of their nice interpolation properties.

Clifford algebra is a mathematical language for geometry extending the usual vector space description. It incorporates such important concepts as complex numbers, quaternions, and matrices which are widely used in modern computer graphics and visualization. The central idea is defining elements of different grades like scalars, vectors, bivectors, trivectors, and quaternions together with a multiplication of different graded elements that unify scalar multiplication, scalar product, quaternion, and matrix multiplication. Its extension to Clifford analysis results in a coordinate invariant differential operator unifying gradient, divergence, and rotation. It opens new ways to understand geometry and physics, making it an excellent choice for new scientific visualization algorithms.

Who Should Attend:
This tutorial is designed for those wanting a good starting base for research in the application of Clifford algebra to scientific visualization.

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