IEEE Visualization 1999 - October 24-29, 1999, San Francisco Airport Hyatt

 

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IEEE Visualization '99 Program:
Tutorials

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TUTORIAL 1 - Volume Graphics

Sunday 8:30am-5:30pm

Instructors: Arie Kaufman, Rick Avila, Sarah Gibson, Jan Hardenbergh, Hanspeter Pfister, Lisa Sobierajski Avila, Milos Sramek, J. Edward Swan II

Level: Advanced

Course Description: Volume graphics is an approach to handling conventional graphics applications with volumetric techniques. This course provides an overview of volume graphics, with a focus on volume modeling, volume manipulation, volume rendering, and their applications. The course is divided into two portions, and can be viewed or structured as two half-day courses. The morning is devoted to fundamentals of volume graphics, modeling and the associated applications. The afternoon is devoted to volume rendering, manipulation and the associated applications. The course will cover the technology and several major applications, available tools and techniques, the challenges confronting the field of volume graphics, and some of the advanced topics in the field.

Who Should Attend: Course material is moderately difficult, due to the level of detail of the algorithms and methodologies. Basic knowledge of hidden-surface methods, rendering models (including basic volume rendering), and computer organization is recommended.

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TUTORIAL 2 - Introduction to Graphics Programming with Java3D

Sunday 8:30am-5:30pm

Instructors: David R. Nadeau (Organizer and Speaker), Henry A. Sowizral

Level: Intermediate

Course Description: Java 3D is a new cross-platform API for developing 3D graphics applications in Java. Java 3D's feature set has been designed to enable quick development of complex 3D applications, and at the same time enable fast and efficient implementations on a variety of platforms, from PCs to workstations. Using Java 3D, software developers can build cross-platform applications that build 3D scenes programmatically, or via loading 3D content from VRML, OBJ, and/or other external files. The Java 3D API includes a rich feature set for building shapes, composing behaviors, interacting with the user, and controlling rendering details.

Who Should Attend: Participants in this tutorial learn the concepts behind Java 3D, the Java 3D class hierarchy, typical usage patterns, ways of avoiding common mistakes, animation and scene design techniques, and tricks for increasing performance and realism.

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TUTORIAL 3 - Interactive Visualization and Web-based Exploration in the Physical and Natural Sciences

Monday 8:30am-5:30pm

Instructors: Theresa Marie Rhyne (Organizer and Speaker), Mike Botts, Bill Hibbard, Lloyd Treinish

Level: Intermediate

Course Description: The visual presentation of large amounts of scientific information and data often requires the merging of image processing methods with computer-generated color displays. The exploration of complex physical and natural sciences data sets involves the application of interactive computer graphics tools and techniques. Visualization tools are just one component of an integrated decision support system for scientists, educators, and the general public.

In this tutorial, we intend to highlight the convergence of visualization environments with the World Wide Web, multi-media tools for desktop videoconferencing, statistical and plotting functions, computer algorithm exploration, perceptual thinking and computer animation techniques. The visual display criteria for research, policy analysis, decision making and science education are not necessarily the same. Therefore, visualization tools need to be flexible in their design to support these different viewpoints and interpretations of data. Our tutorial will thus address the design of visualization systems the support a wide class of users with distinct goals, expectations, capabilities and resources.

Who Should Attend: Scientific researchers, educators, and computer graphics specialists interested in exploring particular issues associated with handling the visual display of scientific information and large scientific data sets. Experience with scientific visualization systems and terminology is helpful as well as understanding of computer graphics programming.

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TUTORIAL 4 - Clifford Algebra, Quaternions and Their Use in Physics and Visualization

Monday 8:30am-5:30pm

Instructors: Hans Hagen, Alyn Rockwood, and Gerik Scheuermann

Level: Intermediate

Course Description: Quaternions build a four-dimensional algebra for three-dimensional geometry. They give the best way to deal with rotations in 3-space. In Scientific Visualization, one has used them to deal with vector fields in space and for animations because of their nice interpolation properties.

Clifford algebra is a mathematical language for geometry extending the usual vector space description. It incorporates such important concepts as complex numbers, quaternions and matrices which are widely used in physics, modern computer graphics and Visualization. The central idea is defining elements of different grades like scalars, vectors, bivectors, trivectors and quaternions together with a multiplication of different graded elements that unifies scalar multiplication, scalar product, vector product, quaternion and matrix multiplication. Its extension to Clifford analysis results in a coordinate invariant differential operator unifying gradient, divergence, and rotation. It opens new ways to understand geometry and physics making it a excellent chance for new Scientific Visualization algorithms.

Who Should Attend: We expect that most people are new to parts of the subject and want to provide an introduction. Parts of the material are of a higher mathematical level, so some people may regard it as advanced. We included question sessions to overcome this problem.

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TUTORIAL 5 - Visualization Toolkits: Applications and Techniques

Tuesday 8:30am-5:30pm

Instructors: Kenneth M. Martin (Organizer and Speaker), Lisa Sobierajski Avila, William E. Lorensen, James V. Miller, William J. Schroeder

Level: Intermediate

Course Description: In this tutorial we will discuss fundamental issues regarding the design, implementation and application of 3D graphics and visualization systems. We will describe and contrast some current systems such as Open Inventor, Java3D, Data Explorer and the Visualization Toolkit. We will examine in more detail the implementation of the Visualization Toolkit. This will be used to illustrate important design issues such as graphics portability, interpreted versus compiled languages, multiple versus single inheritance, data flow models, and user interaction methods. In the remainder of this tutorial we will focus on applying visualization techniques and toolkits to solve problems from a selection of application domains.

Who Should Attend: Attendees should have a basic understanding of computer graphics principles, software development techniques, and visualization algorithms such as color mapping and contouring. This course is intended for users, developers, researchers and practitioners of 3D graphics and data visualization.

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TUTORIAL 6 - Feature Extraction and Visualization of Time-Dependent Flow Fields

Tuesday 8:30am-5:30pm

Instructors: David C. Banks, David N. Kenwright, Frits H. Post, Deborah Silver

Level: Beginning

Course Description: Time-dependent simulations are rapidly becoming more common for studying dynmamic phemonena such as fluid flows. But visualization of the resulting data sets is hard because of the huge amount of data generated. Feature-based visualization is an approach to deal with this problem, extracting salient features and events from the data. The extraction is done in a separate preprocessing step, as it often involves intensive computations. After extraction the features can be reprensented in a very compact way, allowing interactive exploration and real-time visualization.

Important features in flows are for example vortices and eddies, recirculation zones, separation and reattachment structures, and shock waves. Important events occur when new features originate or disappear, or when features interact, split, merge, or collide. Detection of these features and events allows scientists to study these phenomena, discarding any irrelevant or redundant low-level information, and concentrating entirely on high-level information that is close to the physical concepts. Approaches to feature detection and tracking integrate concepts from several fields, such as image processing and computer vision, morphology, physical concepts from fluid dynamics, differential geometry, and topology.

This course presents an overview of contemporary techniques for extracting high-level information from time-dependent flow data fields, covering the fundamentals, a collection of recent results and advanced techniques, and applications of feature-based visualization. The explanations will not require an advanced level of mathematics or physics as a background, but will be largely intuitive and richly illustrated.

Who Should Attend: Visualization, computer graphics, or CFD users and professionals interested in the state-of-the-art in feature-based flow visualization and visual analysis of large time-dependent data sets. A basic knowledge of scientific visualization and numerical simulation is a prerequisite.

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This page was last modified Wednesday, October 06, 1999

 

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